Crescent City Florida

FEATURED LISTING: Florida ::: Crescent City


You may not be aware or think of it, but most floral gifts and presentations in the United States have greens from Crescent City in Putnam County of Florida. This area supplies more than 80% of all cut foliage in the country, and there is plenty left over for export as well! People who love to fish for sport may be relatively familiar with Crescent City, because the bass in the St. John’s River is incomparable. Crescent City has a rich agricultural heritage, and has been a tourist attraction, especially during winter. It has not lived up to its potential in modern times, and remains far behind many other parts of Putnam.

The St. John’s River is Crescent City’s best friend, and has provided sustenance ever since Native Indians fished in its waters, raised crops around its fertile banks and hunted in the dense forests around the gurgling water body. European settlers first came at the dawn of the 18th century, and expanded agriculture with the establishment of vast citrus orchards. The St. John’s River was quick to keep step with the new scene, and provided a convenient and free medium for the movement of people and farm produce. The owner of a large estate in the area took a fancy to a large lake in the area which had the shape of a new moon. The Griffing's Crescent City Real Estate Company began to invite guests from colder climes to spend their winters near the lake, and moved to form a township christened after the lake. The Rail Road had arrived just as the 19th century was drawing to a close, and the future appeared bright for Crescent City when it was incorporated.

Then came 1894: autumn gave way to a long and harsh winter, and the citrus orchards were devastated by the time the first thaws of 1895 spring arrived. It was a setback for the budding town, from which it never seemed to recover. The Great Depression added to Crescent City’s misery, and both local banks born here had to shut their doors forever. The years after World War II revived much of the United States, but Crescent City’s recovery has been slow and slight. The Industrial Revolution, urban development, tourism and the digital age have all left Crescent City to its own devices, and it remains a forgotten rural backwater of the State administration’s conscience.

Less than 2 thousand people live now in Crescent City. The median age is around 40 years and the average income is just about half the national average. About half the people are black, Hispanic and from minority races. The Crescent City Campground shows a way for the general and economic development of this forgotten corner of hectic Florida. Modern amenities indulge vacationers who seek to spend quality time in natural surroundings and the great outdoors. This campground is the only notable exception to a sad example of neglect and stagnation. The bright lights of Orlando and the international joys of Walt Disney World are just 2 hours away by road, but decades if not centuries away in terms of enterprise and spirit.

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